More than meets the Eye
goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.
"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.
"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.
Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.
Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.
One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.
Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.

"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "

In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.

"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.

Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.

Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.

One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.

Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.

Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

gwenlightened:

ineedathneed:

watamato:

been feeling kind of paranoid lately

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Take that time by yourself to get to know yourself and rediscover what makes you shine. Don’t surrender yourself to waiting, and don’t stay isolated for too long, because there’s a beautiful you the world is dying to meet. 

comics that end sadly but wind up being replied to with love are what I live for

a-fictional-vaudeville:

midstorm:

I think Hiccup and Astrid are the best animated couple ever.

I love how their relationship isn’t a major plot point for the films. Astrid isn’t there as a reward for the hero, she is also his best friend (next to Toothless of course). She didn’t stop being a warrior after she became a love interest (and Hiccup wouldn’t want her to, he loves her for it).

They talk about their problems. They fight their enemies together. And they trust each other.

Something that I’m just noticing from these gifs. They actually lean their cheeks into the kisses, opposed to just letting the other do all the work.  That’s something actual couples do when they know each other well enough to know it’s coming.  I love this.

neriede:

Can I just…..?????

Like, this is the single most beautiful piece of animation ever, I mean

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Go ahead, click and drag it, I fucking GUARANTEE that whatever frame it lands on will make you feel better about your day.

my-heaven-has-green-eyes:

toopaletofunction:

staythatswhatimeanttosay:

One nation, under Canada, above Mexico.

with liberty and justice for some 

that’s it that’s the country

harperhug:


#this looks like a still from an 80’s movie

You have no idea how long I had to look before I realized this was Emma Watson and Matthew Lewis.

harperhug:

#this looks like a still from an 80’s movie

You have no idea how long I had to look before I realized this was Emma Watson and Matthew Lewis.

ravenclawslibrary:

fudgeflies:


If you don’t love Ginny Weasley, you’re wrong.


On today’s episode of: scenes that should’ve gone in the FUCKING movie

ravenclawslibrary:

fudgeflies:

If you don’t love Ginny Weasley, you’re wrong.

On today’s episode of: scenes that should’ve gone in the FUCKING movie

novelteathought:

strivingking:

When you’re feeling down and out, REAL friends be like

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okay but the guy in blue gets up and hold onto the back of the red guys shirt like a small child or perhaps a duckling

artofashion:

Rodarte S/S 2014 RTW Details - NYFW

artofashion:

Rodarte S/S 2014 RTW Details - NYFW

xxawesomexlover2135xx:

HAHAHAHAHHAHAHA 

xxawesomexlover2135xx:

HAHAHAHAHHAHAHA